Posted in DC Comics, Science, Superheroes, Superman

Krypton, Earth, and the Drake Equation

One of the most captivating parts of Superman, is his mythology. Granted, his origin bears a striking similarity to biblical and mythological figures. It provides a fascinating background in which to base a truly wonderful superhero. However, a question that may burn in your mind when thinking of it. Why did Jor-el send Superman to Earth specifically? What makes Earth so special? It’s been shown in the comics frequently that there are plenty of other planets capable of supporting life, so why Earth?

In Superman: Birthright, we get a brief glimpse at Jor-El firing the rocket. Running simulations to see if the rocket can even escape Krypton’s destruction. Just as the planet begins to erupt, it seems that an actual target for the rocket is an afterthought. Jor-El runs to the console and quickly selects a planet that seems to have the best chance of letting his infant son live.

“Billions of worlds we know NOTHING about. Merciful Rao, let there be one – Yes. Lit by a yellow star. It’s gravitational pull relatively negligible. If he makes it at all, he’ll stand his best prospects here. Computer, secure COORDINATES.”

Given Jor-El’s rushed state, it’s worth asking. If he had run the calculations sooner, and looked a little longer, would he have found a better option? To unravel this question, let’s use the Drake Equation to see if there is a possibility.

Created by Frank Drake in the 1950s, the Drake Equation was created to help estimate the likely hood of intelligent life existing elsewhere in the universe. At this point in history, no part of the equation has a definitive number, and some are beyond calculation, so right now, we need to use available information, and best guess. The equation proposed looks like this:

N = R* × Fp × ne × Ft × Fi × Fc × L

N represents the number of Intelligent civilizations in the galaxy. R* is the birth rate of suitable stars for life in the Milky Way Galaxy, measured in stars per year. Fp is the fraction of stars with planets. ne represents the number of planets in a star’s habitable zone. Ft for the number of civilizations that have technology and want to make contact. Fi is the fraction of habitable planets were life exists. Fc is planets inhabited by intelligent beings, and L is the average, in years, for an alien civilisation to invent radio, up until their culture is destroyed or disappears.

In this case, we are looking for what N‘s value is. When proposing the equation, Drake used the Earth and what we know of our own solar system as a model. R* has been estimated to be anywhere between 1 and 10. When proposing this, Drake used the middle estimate, so for now, we will use 5. For Fp, Carl Sagan, an American astronomer, believed that most stars had planets. However, the conservative estimate is around 20%, or 1 in 5. With our solar system as a model, then ne equals 1, as Earth is the only habitable planet in our solar system. Again, using Earth as a model, and without any other available data, then Fi, Fe, and Ft are all at 100%. L is the hardest to calculate, as even when using Earth as a model, you can’t find a definitive answer. We are still alive. Hence why we are asking questions. Drake and Sagan estimate that the number maybe anywhere between 100 and 10,00 years. While this gives us an estimate for just our galaxy, the Milky Way is estimated to be 100,00 light years across. In Superman #132, Krypton is stated to be 3 Million light years away from Earth. Within that distance, there are approximately 20 other galaxies. Add in the Drake Equation, and this gives us a possibility of around 2,000 to 200,000 possible planets Jor-El could have sent Superman to, besides Earth.

So, it looks like it was luck that Jor-El chose Earth. Case closed.

However, in 2000, Ward and Brownlee re-evaluated the Drake Equation in their book Rare Earth. They looked back at the estimates previously suggested, and comparing it to data collected in the 50 or so years since its original inception. Their findings force all of those previously established numbers to move to their lower estimate. After re-entering the data, this gives us a maximum number of possible planets from 200,00, to only about 1,000. Condensing this back down to just the Milky Way, this makes it highly likely that Earth is the only planet with intelligent life nearby.

It seems it wasn’t fate that brought the Man of Steel to us. Simply, we were a last resort.

Advertisements
Posted in Anime, British Comics, Comics, DC Comics, Discussion, Evangelion, History, Superheroes, TV

Deconstruction without reference – Watchmen and Neon Genesis Evangelion

In any medium or genre, there are titans. Stories and creators that are looked upon as the very best examples of what that medium or genre can be. When a genre or medium has been around for a while, it’s natural to find works and creators that start to question why it exists. Why do we read and follow superhero comics? Why do we watch and enjoy giant mech anime?

To deconstruct something, is to tear it apart to reveal and expose the subject’s weaknesses. To understand and explore its flaws, inconsistencies, and tropes. To literally take it to pieces. However, what happens when the deconstruction becomes the celebrated work? What impact does the work have, when it’s the first thing recommended to new readers or viewers?

Both Watchmen and Neon Genesis Evangelion are held up as master works of their medium and genre. Watchmen appears on Time Magazine’s Top 100 Best Novels in the English Language. The BBC Culture section, even refers to the series as ‘The Moment Comic Books Grew Up’. Taking apart and examining the superhero genre. Exploring the characters, motives and world, through the lens of a murder mystery. Many regard it as one of the greatest comics ever written. While others, including the books writer, Alan Moore, see it as more than a little overrated. Regardless of the opinion you have on the series, it’s hard to deny its impact, both in and outside the medium. DC Comics have even found themselves leaning back on to the books popularity and world for their storylines “The Button”, and “Doomsday Clock”. Neon Genesis Evangelion holds a similar reputation. Praised as one of the best and most influential anime to come out of the 90’s, let alone of all time. Evangelion is a cult classic, that takes apart the Mecha genre of anime. Exploring what drives the characters, the creation of the giant mechs, the EVA’s in this case, and what it’s like to face the end of the world.

Many ‘must-watch’, and ‘must-read’ articles suggest both of these are top contenders in their fields. Giving multiple reasons for why every fan of both mediums should see them. Many also suggest them as entry level material. This raises the question, what’s the point of a deconstruction, if the audience has no idea what is being deconstructed?

To use Watchmen for a moment. Readers walking into Watchmen for the first time, who have no grasp on the superhero genre of comics, or very little. Will find themselves confronted with the story of a group of apparently former heroes who grew old. When one is killed, the rest take it upon their selves to learn why, as well as dealing with their own everyday lives. However, as Walter Hudsick puts it in ‘Reassembling the Components in the Correct Sequence: Why You Shouldn’t Read Watchmen First’, using Watchmen as an introduction to Superhero comics, is a grave mistake. Watchmen is built on the very history of comics. Its characters are stand ins for specific characters. Dr Manhattan, Nite Owl II, The Comedian, and Ozymandias acting as replacements for The Atom, Blue Beetle, Peacemaker, and Thunderbolt respectively. The world’s history mirroring real world comic book history. Superheroes coming to prominence before a war, thriving through, only to begin to fade in the years after. The in-universe comic of The Black Freighter acting as a stand-in for EC Comics horror line. Even the comics very core as a deconstruction of Superhero literature predates Watchmen’s creation. The likes of Larry Niven’s Man of Steel, Women of Kleenex, Harvey Kurtzman and Wally Wood’s Superduperman!, and Roger Mayer’s Super-Folks, are all sighted as highly influential works in the industry. The influence of Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex showing itself in the relationship of Dr Manhattan and Silk Spectre II for example. The further you dig into comic history, and the more ingrained you are within it, the more you get from Watchmen.

With Neon Genesis Evangelion, we see a slightly different, but equally valid problem. When it comes to Mecha Anime, that is the focus. The Giant Robot battles. The pilots are children or early teen. One or two of them have family who worked on the project that created the robots. There is massive destruction to cities, and the heroes are praised regardless, because they defeated the big bad that episode. That happens when we take this apart and play it as real? We get broken people. Children told that the world rest on their shoulders, that if they don’t do their job, then everyone they know or love will die. Children struggling with depression, anxiety, and inferiority complexes. Haunted by the deaths caused just to write wrongs. A father who is so focused on his work, that the very child he calls upon to save the world, he has driven away and alienated to the point of cruelty. A world population suffering due to the destruction even the battles cause. Adding to that, Evangelion takes apart even anime wide tropes of the ‘submissive but attractive girl’, and the ‘hot headed and tempremental bomb shell’ with Rei Ayanami and Asuka Langley Soryu respectively. If someone approaches Evangelion, without an understanding of Mecha anime, or even anime tropes, then how are they expected to make sense of it, on top of Evangelion’s already confusing nature?

When approaching a deconstruction, with no understanding of the base. Part of the meaning is loss. The comments the creator is making on the subject, fall on ignorant or deaf ears. While that is never meant as an insult on the audience, it’s worth wondering why we recommend such material before a proper introduction? A new reader approaching the material, can certainly enjoy it, and in many cases, it leads to them discovering the very source material they need. But why is it the first point of call?

Posted in Comics, DC Comics, Discussion, Superheroes, Superman

9 Superman Stories Everyone Should Read

While not as popular as the caped crusader, Batman. Superman is *THE* quintessential superhero. The first, and greatest. Since his creation in 1938, Superman and his alter ego Clark Kent, have become the cornerstone of pop culture, recognised the world over, and has become the hero of many. But when it comes to comics, I find that people are incredibly reluctant to explore the man of steel’s many, many wonderful stories. Some refer to him as the big blue boy scout, others say that he is completely un-relatable, or even boring, but I assure you, that’s not the case. While it is incredibly tempting to scream at you all to dive straight into the DC Rebirth books for Superman, it seems worth gathering an understanding of the character and his universe, before his days as a father, husband, and protector of the world from the town of Hamilton County.

With his 79 years in comics, here are 9 to get you started, whether you are a diehard comic reader, curious of Superman, or starting from scratch…

Action Comics #1 by Jerry Seigel and Joe Shuster

fsayuda3sjt2yncfthyf

Superman’s very first appearance, and a true landmark in history, sometimes it’s best to go back to the beginning. While not highly engaging, and provides only a bare bones story, it is always worth taking a step back and looking at how it all started. While getting your hands on a copy of Action Comics #1 is almost impossible, the story has been collected in multiple books, including Superman: The War Years 1938–1945, and the Superman The Golden Age Omnibus.

Superman: American Alien by Max Landis

tsixjdplbdxerjwxxnmf

Released last year (2016 if you’re reading this in the future, hi future!), and made up of 7 issues, Max Landis’s American Alien explores Clark’s life from a young boy, all the way up to his adult life. The book makes Clark highly relatable, especially in his younger years, and delivers hard on important milestones, such as discovering his powers and the isolation he feels, Clark’s first assignment for the Daily Planet, his first meetings with Lois Lane, Batman, and Lex Luther, establishing himself as a hero, and learning from his mistakes. Strongly written, with a rotation of all-star artists from issue to issue, including Nick Dragotta (East of West), Jae Lee (The Dark Tower: Gunslinger Born), Jock (The Losers), and more. A fantastic, self-contained read.

Superman: Earth One by J. Michael Straczynski and Shane Davis

f3hiclmvewz2xynugpau

What would it be like if Superman showed up in modern times? Part of DC’s Earth One line up, Superman: Earth One is a wonderful retelling of part of Clark’s origin, set in the modern day, and exploring Clark’s early days in Metropolis, and his decision of what to do with his life. Exploring both the uncertainty of what to do with your life, post high school, as well as wrestling with his decision for what to do with his powers. Superman: Earth One is full of compelling and heartfelt moments written by Straczynski, paired with Davis’s beautiful renderings, it’s a truly fascinating read that sucks you right into the world. While there are three volumes to the story, the first book can be approached as a standalone story, though the decision to continue will gift you a hauntingly beautiful double page spread in the second volume. Truly worth picking up.

Superman: The Last Son of Krypton by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner and Adam Kubert

fdriotvkkugg0hqviibh

Taking a page from Superman: The Movie, and The Richard Donner cut of Superman II, The Last Son of Krypton tells the story of a Kryptonian pod crash landing on earth, revealing a young boy inside. Adopted by Clark and Lois, and given the name Christopher Kent (a rather lovely nod to the late Christopher Reeve), they start their happy lives, with Clark safe in the knowledge that he is not alone, he is no longer the last of his kind. However, their happy lives are brought to a screeching halt when it is revealed that Christopher is, in fact, the son of one of Superman’s greatest enemies, General Zod. Brilliantly written by Geoff Johns and Richard Donner himself, with stunning art by Adam Kubert, The Last Son of Krypton is a must for fans of the Donner films, and a highly engaging read for everyone else.

Superman: Secret Identity by Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immomen

s0v94ufcoubuicioxlfw

Imagine you lived in the American Mid-West, and in what feels like the ultimate act of cruelty to you, your parents name you Clark Kent and shower you with Superman merchandise. As a result, you’re heavily bullied and can’t stand the sight of Superman. Well, that’s life for the young Clark Kent in Kurt Busiek’s Secret Identity. In a fit of misery one night, and camping on his own, however, he awakes to find he has been given all the powers of Superman. Set in our world, Secret Identity explores what it would be like if Superman truly existed in our world, as well as chronicling his life from a young man, angry at the world for the hand he has been dealt, to a wiser old man, floating above us all as a fatherly figure. A wonderful out of continuity story, that is truly wonderful to behold.

Kingdom Come by Mark Waid and Alex Ross

vfi0y113hjg43bkncuir

Another out of continuity tale, and not essentially a Superman story, but a purely stunning and cinematic experience. Set in a future where Superman and the rest of the Justice League have abandoned their roles as the Earth’s heroes, after the appearance of figures such as Magog, and other metahuman “heroes” who have no problems with killing, including offing The Joker early on in their career. A being known as The Spectre appears to a human minister, Norman McCay, shows him the oncoming apocalypse that is about to break out between the current heroes and the original Justice League, and invites him to help pass judgment on the events to come. Including the threat of nuclear war, and the intense brainwashing of former Justice League member, Billy Batson, aka Captain Marvel (Now known as Shazam!), Kingdom Come is an incredible experience. You do not read Kingdom Come, you live in it. With magnificent painted art by the great Alex Ross, and a story by the wonderful Mark Waid, Kingdom Come is an absolute must.

Superman: For All Seasons by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale

jbkcfhwjcc4d8gaba3mo

From the wonderful team behind Batman: The Long Halloween, and Daredevil: Yellow, Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale turn their sights to the man of steel. Set across four seasons, and narrated by those involved in Clark’s life, namely Johnathan Kent, Lois Lane, Lex Luther, and Lana Lang, For All Seasons may be set in Clark’s early days, but it is not about his origin. The book chronicles how Clark, and Superman, affect the world around him. From his parents, worrying about his life as he leaves home, his co-workers at the Daily Planet, his enemies as he starts to make himself known, and the people he grew up with and left behind. For All Seasons is truly beautiful, and wondrous. As with any Loeb and Sale paring, well worth the read.

Superman: Red Son by Mark Miller and Dave Johnson

mrcwyxi310qw34i381im

We play the “what if” game again for a moment with Mark Miller’s Superman: Red Son. Superman has always been paired with the phrase, “Truth, Justice, and the American Way.” Emphasis on the “American.” But what if Superman’s rocket never landed in Kansas? What if he landed just outside of Moscow? Red Son flips the Superman mythos on its head and gives us a chilling tale of the communist party right in the hands of the most powerful being on Earth. The book also gives us alternative takes on the rest of the Justice League, with a Wonder Woman who sided with the Russians, as well as a Russian Batman, who seeks to take down the all-mighty dictator. Red Son works as a perfect definition for what Superman stands for, by showing us his complete opposite. Always worth a read, with a final page twist that will make you want to read it all over again.

All-Star Superman by Grant Morrison and Frank Quietly

sjrgw3tnewasyfw6mrdj

The book a lot of you probably saw coming, but with good reason. Superman has one year left to live, having effectively developed a form of cancer that is slowly killing him. This twelve-issue series focuses on how Clark chooses to spend his final year. Including a touching birthday gift to Lois, seeking an end to his rivalry with Lex and Bizzaro, and everything he feels is needed before he leaves. All-Star Superman is a truly touching read, dealing with the likes of depression and death, but never dwelling on it. A quintessential Superman and a comic book read.

After that massive stack, I highly recommend What Ever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? By Alan Moore and Curt Swan, Superman Birthright by Mark Waid and Leinil Francis Yu, Superman Secret Origin by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank, The Death and Return of Superman Saga by Various, Superman: Lois and Clark by Dan Jurgens and Lee Weeks, and the incredible Rebirth run currently being published by Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason.

Happy reading Super-fans..!

 

Posted in Comics, DC Comics, Superheroes

Why Shazam Should Return in DC Rebirth.

convergence-shazam-2015-001-017In the year plus since Rebirth was rolled out. DC has managed to gain back good favour with its fans. The mistakes of the New 52 have been largely set right, and we can now enjoy the DC books as they should be. The Superman of old returns, “letting the colour fly”. Bringing us one of the strongest interpretations of Lois Lane in years, as well as their young son Jon. Batman has returned more heavily to his detective roots. Providing truly intriguing stories, focusing on Bruce Wayne and Batman’s intelligence, rather than as a power fantasy. Wonder Woman splits her story between the modern tales of gods fighting amongst gods, as well as her early and brighter adventures. All seems right with the DC universe. However, one character seems to be left out. One that would benefit greatly from the new direction DC has taken.

Shazam!

In the landscape of DC Rebirth, alongside such characters of Jon Kent, Damian Wayne, and the Teen Titans. Young Billy Batson could once again find a home.

05First appearing in Whiz Comics #2, in 1939. Captain Marvel as he was originally known, competed for space on the racks against Superman himself. Created by Bill Parker and C.C. Beck for Fawcett Comics. Young Billy Batson lives on the streets, selling newspapers. Despite his bad situation, he has a cheerful personality, and works hard daily. One day while working outside the subway. He is led down to a mysterious station. Upon boarding the train, he finds himself in an ancient cavern. Statues representing the seven deadly sins to the side, and an old wizard sat alone. The wizard Shazam reveals to Billy that after 3,000 years, he has grown old, and can no longer fight the forces of evil. Explaining to Billy that he has been chosen to take his place, due to him being ‘pure of heart’. The wizard instructs Billy to speak his name, but to say it with purpose. As the word,”Shazam!” leaves his lips, he is granted the power of gods. The wisdom of Soloman. The strength of Hercules. The stamina of Atlas. The power of Zeus. The courage of Achillies, and the speed of Mercury. Billy rises as Earth’s Mightiest Mortal. Captain Marvel!

With Superman, kids could idolise and look up to a superhero they could dream of someday becoming. Captain Marvel however, was the kid who was a hero. Sales of Captain Marvel sored, to the point that his comics at one point out sold the Man of Steel. In 1953 Fawcett stopped its publications of Captain Marvel stories, due to a copyright infringement suit from DC. A black haired, flying strongman was a little on the nose for them. In 1972, DC Comics acquired the rights the Captain Marvel, and thanks to his name, they decided to rename his book, though not the character at the time, Shazam.

“I suppose I feel a lot better about this realm of magic, or mysticism.. Well .. Knowing that you’re guarding the gate.”

Shazam_01_01Originally sent in his own little universe with the rest of the Fawcett characters, Earth-S. Captain Marvel was largely kept separate from the rest of the DC universe, with the occasional fun cross-over with Superman. However, with Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1985, the worlds were merged. Making both Billy Batson, and Captain Marvel a part of the mainstream DC Universe. Joining the Justice League and becoming as much a part of DC continuity as the likes of Green Lantern or Aquaman. Captain Marvel appeared in multiple story lines, both in and out of continuity. Even playing a major part in the highly celebrated Elseworld story Kingdom Come, by Mark Waid and Alex Ross. Fans of DC animated shows, also know the character from Young Justice (2010 – 2013), Justice League Unlimited (2004 – 2006), and Justice League Action (2016). It’s hard to refer to him as an unknown or obscure character.

Shazam! v1 (2013) (Digital TPB) (Darkness-Empire) 071In 2011, DC launched the New 52. Renaming the character Shazam, and modernising the character. Instead of the fun and kind-hearted kid, who worked hard and thought of other. We meet the jaded, sarcastic and brash Billy. Acting kind in front of potential foster parents, only to show his true colours once the door closes. After being fostered by the Vasquezes into a house with other foster children, his origin remains largely the same. Being transported to a strange cave from a train cart, and meeting the wizard Shazam. However, when Shazam scans his heart, he pushes him back and refers to him as an “impure soul”. Billy stands up to the wizard, asking him how long he has been looking for a pure good person. When he responds with “A very long time”, Billy scoffs telling him that there is no such thing.

“People are Horrible. They disappoint you. They let you down. I’ve spent my life learning that. Good people get swallowed up. They get taken advantage of. They disappear. Trust me. It doesn’t matter how good you try to be. Everyone else is going to drag you down with them. You’re searching for something that doesn’t really exist.”

Sensing his life about to end, Shazam gives Billy the power anyway, needing there to be a champion. Black Adam has already returned, and the Earth needs defending.

This change to Billy’s character largely reflects the New 52. A darker, more ‘realistic’ direction for the characters and the universe. While he received a few issues of the Justice League book to tell his origin (which did become its own trade paperback). Shazam never had his own solo series. He became a member of the Justice League, part of an ensemble cast who rarely gained the spotlight.

Superman Shazam - First Thunder (Wezz-DCP) 04-30With Rebirth, light and love were returned to the DC universe. Room was made for lighter characters. Brighter adventures alongside the dark. In this new world, why can’t the Shazam of old return? Despite appearing on the back cover of DC Rebirth’s one-shot, neither Shazam or Billy have made an appearance.

There was once a time, where the adventures of Superman and Shazam brought joy. Tales of a young boy and the Man of Steel fighting side by side. Judd Winick’s First Thunder comes to mind. With Rebirth, it’s time to bring those days back. Imagine stories where Billy teams up with Jon and Damian. Superboy and Robin respectively. How fun would it be to see the kind-hearted kids, Jon and Billy, play off the harsh Damian. Only for Billy to speak the words “Shazam”, and put Damian in his place?

Captain Marvel or Shazam, however you refer to him. Billy Batson has a place in this world, and it’s time the thunder strikes again.

Posted in Batman, Comics, DC Comics, Documentary, History, Marvel, Spider-Man, Superheroes, Superman, The Flash, Video, X-Men

Spotlight on: Nerdsync Productions!

While the properties are everywhere in the 21st century, comics are still one of the hardest mediums to get started with. Especially if you want to dive into the mainstream stuff, such as Marvel and DC. With the use of the internet, you can make the job a little easier for yourself. You can look up character history, cool stories, and maybe get an idea of what you want to read. But it can still be over whelming, with nearly 100 years of comic book history. Enter, YouTube! Through YouTube, it’s never been easier for you to stumble across great comic book content. There are countless Comic Book channels, giving you brief histories of key characters. Run downs of major or recent storylines. Tips on collecting and preserving. Even channels doing fun comic related games, and dares. All you have to do is quickly type ‘comic book’ in the YouTube search engine, and there you go! However, these channels can start to blur together after a time. The same brief histories, of the same characters, feeding back the same information till you can recite it from memory.

Enter Nerdsync.

Since launching their first Comic Misconceptions video on March 26th, 2013. Scott and the Nerdsync crew have worked hard to deliver quality, fun and informative videos for everyone. It doesn’t matter if you are a well-read veteran, who can recite ever single Lantern oath from memory. Or a movie going fan, who wants to break into the source material. Nerdsync breaks down their material to be completely accessible to even the newest of readers. Beyond that, their choice of subject is far and wide. Giving nice little twists on the now stable Comic Book/YouTube formula. You want a history of Superman? Not only will they give it to you, they will go through the real-life reason for his creation, and the story behind that. When a film comes out, and every channel is scrambling to bring you a funny story or origin relating to the characters involved. Nerdsync proves their nerdy worth by talking about science, history, mythology and psychology. There is a reason why the Nerdsync slogan is ‘helping you grow smarter through comics’!

The show’s host, one Scott Niswander, brings a fun, passionate and energetic feel to the show. Encouraging his audience to get involved, create their own content, and start discussions. The show prides itself on its community of ‘loveable nerds’, banning together to help pool together resources, create on going jokes, and sometimes, just taking to the internet to spread their love of comics. Over the 4 years since Nerdsync burst on to the scene. Other shows and creators have taken to the channel, and added their own little segments, connecting to their own work. Giving us an even greater variation, to an already wonderful channel. We have Hass with Comicana, bringing us insightful looks at how comic pages work. Exploring the flow of panels, pacing and tone, using recent books, and well-known classics. We are given a dose of legal history with Joel in Super Suits, breaking down the insane history of comic book lawsuits. Not to mention the fantastic cameo and cross over appearances from the like of Auram, Ricky of Stewdippin, and Mike of PBS Idea Channel.

What makes Nerdsync stand apart, is its dedication to education through comics. In the world of academic, comics have a surprising and glorious history. They have been the subject matter when talking about so many real-world events. Including politics, genetics, physics, mythology, and pseudoscience. While these concepts, books and papers, may seem dry and none accessible to outside readers. Nerdsync delivers compelling, interesting, and outright fun material, that inspires and entertains the audience. It’s hard to deny the number of comics, characters, theories, and principles you will be exposed to, without realising it. And, you will enjoy every second of it.

“Holy here we go again Batman!”