Posted in DC Comics, Science, Superheroes, Superman

Krypton, Earth, and the Drake Equation

One of the most captivating parts of Superman, is his mythology. Granted, his origin bears a striking similarity to biblical and mythological figures. It provides a fascinating background in which to base a truly wonderful superhero. However, a question that may burn in your mind when thinking of it. Why did Jor-el send Superman to Earth specifically? What makes Earth so special? It’s been shown in the comics frequently that there are plenty of other planets capable of supporting life, so why Earth?

In Superman: Birthright, we get a brief glimpse at Jor-El firing the rocket. Running simulations to see if the rocket can even escape Krypton’s destruction. Just as the planet begins to erupt, it seems that an actual target for the rocket is an afterthought. Jor-El runs to the console and quickly selects a planet that seems to have the best chance of letting his infant son live.

“Billions of worlds we know NOTHING about. Merciful Rao, let there be one – Yes. Lit by a yellow star. It’s gravitational pull relatively negligible. If he makes it at all, he’ll stand his best prospects here. Computer, secure COORDINATES.”

Given Jor-El’s rushed state, it’s worth asking. If he had run the calculations sooner, and looked a little longer, would he have found a better option? To unravel this question, let’s use the Drake Equation to see if there is a possibility.

Created by Frank Drake in the 1950s, the Drake Equation was created to help estimate the likely hood of intelligent life existing elsewhere in the universe. At this point in history, no part of the equation has a definitive number, and some are beyond calculation, so right now, we need to use available information, and best guess. The equation proposed looks like this:

N = R* × Fp × ne × Ft × Fi × Fc × L

N represents the number of Intelligent civilizations in the galaxy. R* is the birth rate of suitable stars for life in the Milky Way Galaxy, measured in stars per year. Fp is the fraction of stars with planets. ne represents the number of planets in a star’s habitable zone. Ft for the number of civilizations that have technology and want to make contact. Fi is the fraction of habitable planets were life exists. Fc is planets inhabited by intelligent beings, and L is the average, in years, for an alien civilisation to invent radio, up until their culture is destroyed or disappears.

In this case, we are looking for what N‘s value is. When proposing the equation, Drake used the Earth and what we know of our own solar system as a model. R* has been estimated to be anywhere between 1 and 10. When proposing this, Drake used the middle estimate, so for now, we will use 5. For Fp, Carl Sagan, an American astronomer, believed that most stars had planets. However, the conservative estimate is around 20%, or 1 in 5. With our solar system as a model, then ne equals 1, as Earth is the only habitable planet in our solar system. Again, using Earth as a model, and without any other available data, then Fi, Fe, and Ft are all at 100%. L is the hardest to calculate, as even when using Earth as a model, you can’t find a definitive answer. We are still alive. Hence why we are asking questions. Drake and Sagan estimate that the number maybe anywhere between 100 and 10,00 years. While this gives us an estimate for just our galaxy, the Milky Way is estimated to be 100,00 light years across. In Superman #132, Krypton is stated to be 3 Million light years away from Earth. Within that distance, there are approximately 20 other galaxies. Add in the Drake Equation, and this gives us a possibility of around 2,000 to 200,000 possible planets Jor-El could have sent Superman to, besides Earth.

So, it looks like it was luck that Jor-El chose Earth. Case closed.

However, in 2000, Ward and Brownlee re-evaluated the Drake Equation in their book Rare Earth. They looked back at the estimates previously suggested, and comparing it to data collected in the 50 or so years since its original inception. Their findings force all of those previously established numbers to move to their lower estimate. After re-entering the data, this gives us a maximum number of possible planets from 200,00, to only about 1,000. Condensing this back down to just the Milky Way, this makes it highly likely that Earth is the only planet with intelligent life nearby.

It seems it wasn’t fate that brought the Man of Steel to us. Simply, we were a last resort.

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Posted in Comics, DC Comics, Discussion, Superheroes, Superman

9 Superman Stories Everyone Should Read

While not as popular as the caped crusader, Batman. Superman is *THE* quintessential superhero. The first, and greatest. Since his creation in 1938, Superman and his alter ego Clark Kent, have become the cornerstone of pop culture, recognised the world over, and has become the hero of many. But when it comes to comics, I find that people are incredibly reluctant to explore the man of steel’s many, many wonderful stories. Some refer to him as the big blue boy scout, others say that he is completely un-relatable, or even boring, but I assure you, that’s not the case. While it is incredibly tempting to scream at you all to dive straight into the DC Rebirth books for Superman, it seems worth gathering an understanding of the character and his universe, before his days as a father, husband, and protector of the world from the town of Hamilton County.

With his 79 years in comics, here are 9 to get you started, whether you are a diehard comic reader, curious of Superman, or starting from scratch…

Action Comics #1 by Jerry Seigel and Joe Shuster

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Superman’s very first appearance, and a true landmark in history, sometimes it’s best to go back to the beginning. While not highly engaging, and provides only a bare bones story, it is always worth taking a step back and looking at how it all started. While getting your hands on a copy of Action Comics #1 is almost impossible, the story has been collected in multiple books, including Superman: The War Years 1938–1945, and the Superman The Golden Age Omnibus.

Superman: American Alien by Max Landis

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Released last year (2016 if you’re reading this in the future, hi future!), and made up of 7 issues, Max Landis’s American Alien explores Clark’s life from a young boy, all the way up to his adult life. The book makes Clark highly relatable, especially in his younger years, and delivers hard on important milestones, such as discovering his powers and the isolation he feels, Clark’s first assignment for the Daily Planet, his first meetings with Lois Lane, Batman, and Lex Luther, establishing himself as a hero, and learning from his mistakes. Strongly written, with a rotation of all-star artists from issue to issue, including Nick Dragotta (East of West), Jae Lee (The Dark Tower: Gunslinger Born), Jock (The Losers), and more. A fantastic, self-contained read.

Superman: Earth One by J. Michael Straczynski and Shane Davis

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What would it be like if Superman showed up in modern times? Part of DC’s Earth One line up, Superman: Earth One is a wonderful retelling of part of Clark’s origin, set in the modern day, and exploring Clark’s early days in Metropolis, and his decision of what to do with his life. Exploring both the uncertainty of what to do with your life, post high school, as well as wrestling with his decision for what to do with his powers. Superman: Earth One is full of compelling and heartfelt moments written by Straczynski, paired with Davis’s beautiful renderings, it’s a truly fascinating read that sucks you right into the world. While there are three volumes to the story, the first book can be approached as a standalone story, though the decision to continue will gift you a hauntingly beautiful double page spread in the second volume. Truly worth picking up.

Superman: The Last Son of Krypton by Geoff Johns, Richard Donner and Adam Kubert

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Taking a page from Superman: The Movie, and The Richard Donner cut of Superman II, The Last Son of Krypton tells the story of a Kryptonian pod crash landing on earth, revealing a young boy inside. Adopted by Clark and Lois, and given the name Christopher Kent (a rather lovely nod to the late Christopher Reeve), they start their happy lives, with Clark safe in the knowledge that he is not alone, he is no longer the last of his kind. However, their happy lives are brought to a screeching halt when it is revealed that Christopher is, in fact, the son of one of Superman’s greatest enemies, General Zod. Brilliantly written by Geoff Johns and Richard Donner himself, with stunning art by Adam Kubert, The Last Son of Krypton is a must for fans of the Donner films, and a highly engaging read for everyone else.

Superman: Secret Identity by Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immomen

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Imagine you lived in the American Mid-West, and in what feels like the ultimate act of cruelty to you, your parents name you Clark Kent and shower you with Superman merchandise. As a result, you’re heavily bullied and can’t stand the sight of Superman. Well, that’s life for the young Clark Kent in Kurt Busiek’s Secret Identity. In a fit of misery one night, and camping on his own, however, he awakes to find he has been given all the powers of Superman. Set in our world, Secret Identity explores what it would be like if Superman truly existed in our world, as well as chronicling his life from a young man, angry at the world for the hand he has been dealt, to a wiser old man, floating above us all as a fatherly figure. A wonderful out of continuity story, that is truly wonderful to behold.

Kingdom Come by Mark Waid and Alex Ross

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Another out of continuity tale, and not essentially a Superman story, but a purely stunning and cinematic experience. Set in a future where Superman and the rest of the Justice League have abandoned their roles as the Earth’s heroes, after the appearance of figures such as Magog, and other metahuman “heroes” who have no problems with killing, including offing The Joker early on in their career. A being known as The Spectre appears to a human minister, Norman McCay, shows him the oncoming apocalypse that is about to break out between the current heroes and the original Justice League, and invites him to help pass judgment on the events to come. Including the threat of nuclear war, and the intense brainwashing of former Justice League member, Billy Batson, aka Captain Marvel (Now known as Shazam!), Kingdom Come is an incredible experience. You do not read Kingdom Come, you live in it. With magnificent painted art by the great Alex Ross, and a story by the wonderful Mark Waid, Kingdom Come is an absolute must.

Superman: For All Seasons by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale

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From the wonderful team behind Batman: The Long Halloween, and Daredevil: Yellow, Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale turn their sights to the man of steel. Set across four seasons, and narrated by those involved in Clark’s life, namely Johnathan Kent, Lois Lane, Lex Luther, and Lana Lang, For All Seasons may be set in Clark’s early days, but it is not about his origin. The book chronicles how Clark, and Superman, affect the world around him. From his parents, worrying about his life as he leaves home, his co-workers at the Daily Planet, his enemies as he starts to make himself known, and the people he grew up with and left behind. For All Seasons is truly beautiful, and wondrous. As with any Loeb and Sale paring, well worth the read.

Superman: Red Son by Mark Miller and Dave Johnson

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We play the “what if” game again for a moment with Mark Miller’s Superman: Red Son. Superman has always been paired with the phrase, “Truth, Justice, and the American Way.” Emphasis on the “American.” But what if Superman’s rocket never landed in Kansas? What if he landed just outside of Moscow? Red Son flips the Superman mythos on its head and gives us a chilling tale of the communist party right in the hands of the most powerful being on Earth. The book also gives us alternative takes on the rest of the Justice League, with a Wonder Woman who sided with the Russians, as well as a Russian Batman, who seeks to take down the all-mighty dictator. Red Son works as a perfect definition for what Superman stands for, by showing us his complete opposite. Always worth a read, with a final page twist that will make you want to read it all over again.

All-Star Superman by Grant Morrison and Frank Quietly

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The book a lot of you probably saw coming, but with good reason. Superman has one year left to live, having effectively developed a form of cancer that is slowly killing him. This twelve-issue series focuses on how Clark chooses to spend his final year. Including a touching birthday gift to Lois, seeking an end to his rivalry with Lex and Bizzaro, and everything he feels is needed before he leaves. All-Star Superman is a truly touching read, dealing with the likes of depression and death, but never dwelling on it. A quintessential Superman and a comic book read.

After that massive stack, I highly recommend What Ever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? By Alan Moore and Curt Swan, Superman Birthright by Mark Waid and Leinil Francis Yu, Superman Secret Origin by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank, The Death and Return of Superman Saga by Various, Superman: Lois and Clark by Dan Jurgens and Lee Weeks, and the incredible Rebirth run currently being published by Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason.

Happy reading Super-fans..!

 

Posted in Batman, Comics, DC Comics, Documentary, History, Marvel, Spider-Man, Superheroes, Superman, The Flash, Video, X-Men

Spotlight on: Nerdsync Productions!

While the properties are everywhere in the 21st century, comics are still one of the hardest mediums to get started with. Especially if you want to dive into the mainstream stuff, such as Marvel and DC. With the use of the internet, you can make the job a little easier for yourself. You can look up character history, cool stories, and maybe get an idea of what you want to read. But it can still be over whelming, with nearly 100 years of comic book history. Enter, YouTube! Through YouTube, it’s never been easier for you to stumble across great comic book content. There are countless Comic Book channels, giving you brief histories of key characters. Run downs of major or recent storylines. Tips on collecting and preserving. Even channels doing fun comic related games, and dares. All you have to do is quickly type ‘comic book’ in the YouTube search engine, and there you go! However, these channels can start to blur together after a time. The same brief histories, of the same characters, feeding back the same information till you can recite it from memory.

Enter Nerdsync.

Since launching their first Comic Misconceptions video on March 26th, 2013. Scott and the Nerdsync crew have worked hard to deliver quality, fun and informative videos for everyone. It doesn’t matter if you are a well-read veteran, who can recite ever single Lantern oath from memory. Or a movie going fan, who wants to break into the source material. Nerdsync breaks down their material to be completely accessible to even the newest of readers. Beyond that, their choice of subject is far and wide. Giving nice little twists on the now stable Comic Book/YouTube formula. You want a history of Superman? Not only will they give it to you, they will go through the real-life reason for his creation, and the story behind that. When a film comes out, and every channel is scrambling to bring you a funny story or origin relating to the characters involved. Nerdsync proves their nerdy worth by talking about science, history, mythology and psychology. There is a reason why the Nerdsync slogan is ‘helping you grow smarter through comics’!

The show’s host, one Scott Niswander, brings a fun, passionate and energetic feel to the show. Encouraging his audience to get involved, create their own content, and start discussions. The show prides itself on its community of ‘loveable nerds’, banning together to help pool together resources, create on going jokes, and sometimes, just taking to the internet to spread their love of comics. Over the 4 years since Nerdsync burst on to the scene. Other shows and creators have taken to the channel, and added their own little segments, connecting to their own work. Giving us an even greater variation, to an already wonderful channel. We have Hass with Comicana, bringing us insightful looks at how comic pages work. Exploring the flow of panels, pacing and tone, using recent books, and well-known classics. We are given a dose of legal history with Joel in Super Suits, breaking down the insane history of comic book lawsuits. Not to mention the fantastic cameo and cross over appearances from the like of Auram, Ricky of Stewdippin, and Mike of PBS Idea Channel.

What makes Nerdsync stand apart, is its dedication to education through comics. In the world of academic, comics have a surprising and glorious history. They have been the subject matter when talking about so many real-world events. Including politics, genetics, physics, mythology, and pseudoscience. While these concepts, books and papers, may seem dry and none accessible to outside readers. Nerdsync delivers compelling, interesting, and outright fun material, that inspires and entertains the audience. It’s hard to deny the number of comics, characters, theories, and principles you will be exposed to, without realising it. And, you will enjoy every second of it.

“Holy here we go again Batman!”

Posted in Batman, Comics, DC Comics, Review, Superheroes, Superman

Super Sons #6: Planet of the Capes Part 1 (2017) [Review]

Super Sons 06 (2017)Six issues in to the Super Sons series, and it’s time to start the boys second arc. One that explores not only the super sons team, but introduces Jon to the Teen Titans! After an issue off, the wonderful Peter Tomasi returns to writing, and the fun and energetic art of Jorge Jimenez explodes off the page.

After the previous issue, we find the Kent’s living in Metropolis, and Jon preparing for a night of super heroics, and a chance to test his ever-growing powers. Tomasi is fantastic at highlighting the family dynamic of the Kent household. Even when confined to a handful of panels, their interactions are perfect.

Jon: “Come on, it’s FRIDAY – Damien’s Dad lets him stay out all night.”

Clark: “Damian’s Dad dresses like a bat and gets hit in the head 28 times every night. So maybe not the best argument.”

After the first arc of Super Sons, and the in-between issue, this is the first time we can really see Lois and Clark’s thoughts on Jon’s team up with Damian, and putting himself in harm’s way without Superman around to save him. There moment together as Jon leaves, adds to Clark’s development as a father, and shows, not only that he is learning from his own past, but the example his own father set.

Super Sons 06 (2017)sfdghsdfhfgshAs with the previous 5 issues, and there appearances together in Superman, Damian and Jon play off each other with an incredible beat to their dialogue. As they take to the streets to fight crime, Damian’s more harsh and darker upbringing comes out almost instantly, jumping to conclusions, such as jay walking quickly turning to store robbery, while Jon, despite being the younger of the pair, acts as the voice of reason between the two.

The Teen Titan’s introduction here works remarkably well, with Beast Boy acting as his usual jokey self, appearing as a cat beside Jon, just after Jon rescues neighbourhood cats, almost rubbing in Jon’s more wholesome and ‘uncool’ roots. The moment the Teen Titans show off, there is an immediate change in how Jon is treated. Robin, while still cocky and commanding, takes on a far more authoritative and constructed tone, almost hammering in Jon’s younger age, as though the work Jon and Damian do, is below actual Super heroics. It seems that even being the son of Superman doesn’t grant you all the privileges. The abandonment of Jon is even commented on by Starfire, despite his abundance of power, he is still just a ten-year-old kid. Despite Jon’s almost carefree attitude, it’s clearly shown that it bothers him, providing a very interesting look at Jon as an average ten-year-old. Upset at not being invited, feelings of being left out.

Despite the book itself focusing on the adventures of Damian and Jon, this issue spotlights the Teen Titan’s incredibly well, in a brief encounter with Atom-Master and Chun Yull, the team’s dynamics and how they work off each other are defined and played with. Something that is remarkable to see in such a short space of time. This arcs villain rears his head, and while his appearance is brief, his impact hammers in the theme of age and youth in this issue, and possibly the entire arc. Damian’s feelings of superiority due to his older status and training, may well be a hindrance to him here.

Damian: “Weird. No one is answering.”

Jon: “Who are you calling?”

Damian: “My Team. I have more responsibilities tonight than just us.”

Jon: “Sounds super-important if they’re ignoring your calls.”

Damian: “They’re raw. Young. I’m still working on them. One day maybe you’ll even be ready to be a Titan.”

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This arc, in the first issue at least, is shaping up to be an interesting one when it comes to growing, not only Jon, but especially Damian as characters. While it’s fun and interesting to see their personalities play off of each other, they need to grow. Especially Damian. The added benefit of this issue, is a curiosity to explore the current Teen Titans book. The team makes enough of an impact here, as well as showcases another side to Damian, that certainly leads to a desire to check out their solo title.

As the start of a new arc, this issue is a perfect jumping on point for new readers, as well as intriguing set up for things to come.

Posted in Batman, Comics, Discussion, Superheroes, Superman

Healing through comics: Dark Night, It’s A Bird, and Something Terrible.

Comics have had this stigma following them for years. That they are created solely for children and the illiterate. Comics are primarily known for their colourful characters and leaps in logic, and because of this, for years, it was hard for people to shake that mindset. By 2017, we have entire film and game franchises based on the world of comics. While the print media doesn’t get as much attention as it should, the franchises and culture spawned from their pages have spread worldwide, to every culture and corner of the world. Pop culture has taken on a life of its own, and intertwined itself with our own. With characters we can all connect with, or at least recognise, some have gone on to use these familiar grounds to tell their own personal stories. To help them overcome terrible situations, and to impart their message to those that shouldn’t have to suffer in silence.

Dark Night: A True Batman Story – Battling Depression and the Aftermath of Assault.

dark-knight-true-batman-story-1Paul Dini is responsible for one of the most beloved animated comic series of all time, Batman: The Animated Series. Having been a part of Warner Bros. Animation department, working on Animaniacs, and Tiny Toons, as well as creating the widely popular character of Harley Quinn. Paul Dini is practically a veteran of pop culture. In his 2016 book, Dark Night: A True Batman Story, with art by Eduardo Risso, Dini tells a very personal tale. Discussing not only his life long battle with depression, but an incident one night that shock him to his very core, and caused such physical harm, that he found himself in hospital, requiring major surgery. Dark Night tells Dini’s incredibly personal story about how pop culture, and specifically Batman, has helped shape his life, and got him through that painful point in time. Dark Night explores the importance of pop culture. How we use figures in our lives, the real and the fictional, to personify our demons. The idea of the Scarecrow telling us to give into fear. The Joker, mocking us for weakness. But how our heroes can knock some sense into us, and act as our guiding light out of darkness.

It’s A Bird – The fear of inevitable illness and worthlessness.

Its-A-Bird...cover_Steven T. Seagle is a comic writer who has just been given every comic writers dream, the chance to write Superman. However, Seagle is nowhere near excited, due to his inability to connect to Superman. The idea of Superman brings to his mind his fears of death, long term genetic illness, and loss, due to what happened during his first encounter with a Superman comic. Steven relays to the reader how he came to understand a disease he fears, his strained relationship with his father, and his feelings of worthlessness.  It’s a Bird provides a touching semi-autobiographical story that explores mortality. The cultural significance of the Icon, the importance of Superman, and the power of an idea. The book follows Steven while he battles his own memories, and talks to those around him, asking what Superman means to them.

Something Terrible – Childhood Sexual Abuse and Breaking the Cycle

something_terrible_cover_by_dryponder-d64psaoSexual abuse is one of the worse things someone can experience, particularly at a young age. Your sense of self and safety are corrupted, and you feel like you can never trust those around you. Dean Trippe is one man who suffered such a terrible ordeal in childhood, and sought comfort in his love of Batman. However, he hears of the cycle of abuse, that ‘the abused becomes the abuser’, and as he grows up, marries, and has a son of his own, he lives with a metaphorical gun to his head, in fear that it may be true. Through this short book, Trippe explores what happened to him, the impact it had on his life, and decides to draw himself a new version of events. This stunning book acts as a reminder to all affected, that they are not alone. That even their fictional loves, in Trippe’s case Batman, can be used to help in the healing process. Trippe portrays the reality of the events in a slightly off black and white tone, only to explode in colour when the world of pop culture comes to young Dean’s aid, in a single page spread that brings a tear to the eye. While the comic is available online for anyone to see, the printed version contains a touching added epilogue of Dean ‘returning the favour’ for Batman.

We all deal with trauma in different ways. Sometimes it’s hard to find a comfort, and easy to feel like you are alone. But these stories exist to prove that it is possible to find a way out, and that no matter your coping method, what world you choose to live in. You are not alone.
 

Dark Night: A True Batman Story by Paul Dini and Eduardo Risso is available in both Hardcover and Paperback through DC’s Vertigo Imprint. Available on Amazon.

It’s a Bird by Steven Seagle and Teddy Kristiansen is available in Paperback with an out of print Hardcover. Published through DC’s Vertigo Imprint. Available on Amazon.

Something Terrible by Dean Trippe is available in Hardcover from Iron Circus Comics. Available on Amazon.

Posted in Comics, DC Comics, History, Superheroes, Superman

A Brief History of Superboy

The mantle of Superman is a heavy one to bear. With nearly 80 years of history, and a legacy that stands for truth, justice and hope. Those hoping to live up to the mantle have a lot to deal with. The members of the Super Family stretch far at different points of history, with the name Superboy passing from member to member. To those training to become the man of steel, those made from him, and ultimately the heir to Superman. With titles such as Superman and Supersons currently being released from DC, it seems fitting to look back at the history of the mainstream Superboy name.

Kal-El/Clark Kent:

895599-superboyOriginally introduced in More Fun Comics # 101 in 1945. The first Superboy was simply a young Clark Kent. His first appearance chronicles an 8-year-old Clark discovering his powers, and leaning that he can’t use them out in the open. Ending the issue with Clark deciding on a public identity, and designing his Superboy costume. Superboy went on to have his own ongoing series, including Superboy (1949 – 1977), and The New Adventures of Superboy (1980 – 1984). The stories chronicle the childhood adventures of Superboy, growing up in Kansas, and learning to use his powers. As well as back up features including his time with the Legion of Super-Heroes, a group of teenage superheroes from the 30th and 31st century. These stories were basically erased from continuity after the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1985.

There was a second Superboy series from 1989 to 1991, however this is in continuity with the Superboy television series. Lasting 22 issues. This incarnation of Superboy makes appearances in various other titles, such as Superman Secret Origin by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank, as well as an alternate reality version in Superman Secret Identity by Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immonen.

Kon-El/Conner Kent:

5776290-1d156a231f5306f48a2d61c8446b22efOriginally claiming to be the Man of Steel himself, Kon-El made his first appearance in Adventures of Superman #500, at a time where the real Superman was dead, due to his fight with Doomsday. A genetic clone of both Superman and Lex Luther, He showed up in Metropolis, sporting a blue and red Superman leotard, two belts, high black boots, and a black leather jacket. His very design screaming 90s era comics. Kon-El fought for the right to be named the one true Superman until the day Superman returned, returning to the Cadmus institute to learn more about his origin. Eventually, he moves out of Clark Kent’s apartment, and starts his journey to find his place.

Moving to Hawaii, he starts a relationship with reporter Tana Moon. He goes on a multitude of adventures in his own book, even crossing paths with Aquaman, and Amanda Waller’s Suicide Squad. At times, he joins forces with the likes of Knockout, and The Ravers, before becoming a founding member of Young Justice. Alongside Robin (Tim Drake), and Impulse (Bart Allen II). Shortly after this, he is excepted by Superman as part of the family, and receives the name Conner Kent. His adventures, both solo and with the team, take him through the ‘Day of Judgement’ event, the death of Tana Moon, and Our World’s at War. With the disbanding of Young Justice, Superboy becomes a member of The New Teen Titans, and learns of his connection to Lex Luther, before dying during Infinite Crisis, at the hands of Superboy-Prime.

In the 30th Century, Conner is reborn by the Legion of Super-Heroes, and returned to the 21st Century alongside Bart Allen. Re-joining the Teen Titans, and dawning his more iconic costume of the black Superman T-shirt, and jeans combo. He takes part in The Blackest Night event, New Krypton, and eventually becomes a founding member of the Supermen of America.

This incarnation of Kon-El, became the inspiration for the fan favourite portrayal in the Young Justice animated series. As well as other animated counterparts.

New 52 Kon-El:

e0ffdfb0d1bbfd99145c7ae6b87ac492--supergirl-superman-superhero-charactersWith the New 52, characters were re-imagined, almost from the ground up. This incarnation, while based on the previous Conner Kent, has some major differences. A clone of Jon Lane Kent, created by the N.O.W.H.E.R.E. organization, a nefarious institute, founded by Harvest. Raised in alternate reality simulations, and awoken by his caretaker and surrogate mother, Caitlin Fairchild. Superboy is cloned and raised as a weapon by N.O.W.H.E.R.E. to be used against rogue metahumans. On his first field mission, he loses control of his telekinetic powers, and separates from N.O.W.H.E.R.E. before being attacked by his targets. After running in to Supergirl, he learns of his Kryptonian history, and is given the name Kon-El by here, ‘an abomination in the House of El’. Superboy returns to N.O.W.H.E.R.E. and learns that he was the second clone created, but fails to learn more in his fight against Rose Wilson.

He takes part in The Culling event, alongside the Teen Titans and The Ravagers, teaming up with the titans, and ending up stranded on an island full of animals thought to be extinct, alongside Wonder Girl. Upon returning to New York, he is attacked by H’el, due to his status as a clone, Supergirl saves him and is taken to Superman after being badly injured. At the Fortress of Solitude, they discover that he has three strands of DNA, one human, one kryptonian, and one unidentified. To stop Superboy’s genetics breaking down any further, Superman gives him his Kryptonian battle armour, which limits his telekinetic powers to only items he touches.

He joins Supergirl in the Crucible story line, stating that he has nothing to lose. However, he is captured in an attempt to use him to start an entire clone army of Kryptonians. He and Supergirl manage to destroy the cloning facility, but Superboy returns to Earth with none of his mounting questions answered.

Jonathan Kent:

jon-white-superboy-189580-1280x0Born during the Convergence event, Jonathan Samuel Kent is the son of the Pre-New 52 Clark Kent and Lois Lane-Kent, and the most recent incarnation of Superboy. Born in the Batcave of Flashpoint Batman (Thomas Wayne), and delivered by Batman himself, Jon grew up in the New 52 Earth as Jon White, while his parents hide from a world that was not their own. When this Earth loses their Superman, Jon discovers the secret identity of his father, as Clark rises to take up the reigns, and protect the world he has raised his son and called home. Jon begins to discover his abilities, and starts to fight alongside his father, before falling ill. His parents rush him to this world’s Fortress of Solitude, where Jon beats his first supervillain, The Eradicator, alongside his mother, dawning Batman’s HellBat armour, and his father. Due to Jon’s mixed heritage, the nature and strength of his powers become a source of concern throughout various storylines and as he develops.

During a science experiment Jon creates for school, Jon, Superman and Krypto the dog, are transported to Dinosaur Island, where they encounter Captain William Storm of The Losers. They return home, and when Christmas roles round, Jon attempts to find the prefect Christmas tree, before needing to be rescued by Nobody and Goliath. Jon wakes up in the Batcave, discovering that Robin (Damien Wayne) has been keeping his eye on him. The two argue, before Batman and Superman show up and order the two of them to undertake a series of team work exercises, to learn to work together. Despite their fighting, they learn to work together, and form their own hap-hazard team, Super Sons.

Later, Jon is kidnapped by long time Superman villain, Mister Mxyzptlk, in the Superman Reborn event. Jon becomes the major saving point of the event, as Mxyptlk blurs realities and bring the New 52 Superman and Lois Lane in to this reality, in place of Jon’s parents. The people he knows as his parents don’t recognise him, and are simply colleagues rather than married. It’s Jon who eventually defeats Mxyzptlk, by bringing forth his real parents, and making him merge the two versions of his parents together, making a new history for all of them. One in which Jon was born in the Fortress of Solitude, in the presence of Batman and Wonder Woman. His godfather is Perry White, and they have never had to hide themselves, reclaiming the public identity of Kent.

During Black Dawn, Batman becomes concerned of the slow rate in which Jon’s powers are developing, and discovers that several members of the city they live in, are in fact alien, and aligned with Superman villain, Manchester Black. Manchester Black has been suppressing his powers for years, and upon taking out Batman, Robin, Frankenstein, and Frankenstein’s Bride, Manchester takes control of Jon, unlocking his full potential, and pits him against Superman. Jon is finally able to overcome the mind control, and with the help of his lifelong friend Kathy, defeats Manchester with a blast of psychic feedback. Jon’s powers are drained, but they eventually return, along with the ability to fly.