DC’s Action Comics #1000 Sneak Peak Animation

2018 marks the 80th anniversary of Superman! And while DC won’t be celebrating it properly until April with the release of Action Comics #1000. They released a lovely little sneak peak to the upcoming celebration in the form of a short animation.

It feels heavily reminiscent of the animation released for the 75th anniversary. Though the 75th anniversary animation pays tribute to multiple versions of Superman. Including George Reeves and Christopher Reeve’s interpretation, right down to Reeve’s flying scene over the Earth.

2018 already has a lot planned for the Man of Steel. Including the aforementioned Action Comics #1000, the return of the red trunks and the take over by Brian Michael Bendis (which I’m still on the fence about). Here’s hoping DC peppers the year with more of these lovely little added extras!


Superman: Speeding Bullets (1993)

Time for a trip to the Elseworld titles! A series of stories set in the DC universe but out of continuity. A chance for writers to flex their creative muscles and ask ‘what if’ questions. Superman: Speeding Bullets was released in 1993 and written by J.M. Dematteis with art by Eduardo Barreto. The ‘what if’ in this case is a little bit strange but very fascinating. What if Superman was Batman?

The cover is just fantastic. Using the iconic image of Superman flying over the city that appeared on Superman #01 in 1939. Instead of a yellow background, the cover reflects Gotham’s aesthetics with a gradient of black to grey. Superman strikes the same pose within the oval, but his costume is replaced with a modified Bat suit. Noticeable, his face is covered with a full mask, similar to that of Spider-Man, rather than a cowl. The emblem on the chest is a perfect fusion of Superman’s shield and Batman’s yellow oval design with the overall shape being that of the shield, and the bat stretching out inside. The style, particularly in the cape, feels inspired by the work of Norm Breyfogle or Todd McFarlane. For this darker take and Superman’s Alien status, the style of cape works perfectly, as it gives it the feel of having a mind of its own. Even the books title box corrupts the original image. Taking the smooth curves at the edges and giving them a jagged horn like appearance.

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Throughout the book we have narration, asking what it would be like if things turned out differently. We see a rocked escaping a planet as it explodes, a green glow all around. The rocket travels through space and crash lands just outside of Gotham City, where it is discovered by Thomas and Martha Wayne along with their butler Alfred. Inside is a young boy, Kal-El of the planet Krypton. Through pages styled to look like a photo album, we see the young boy grow as Martha and Thomas decide to adopt him, naming him Bruce Wayne. Martha dotes on the child, stating to love him as though she had given birth do him. Thomas was intrigued by the boy’s ability to quickly take to his lessons. How the boy was so agile, never a bruise or broken bone. Thomas was compassionate and kind, concerned with testing his mental and physical limits. He imparts to Bruce:

“The cowards and bullies use violence. But you – of all who live – must aspire to something better. Something higher.”

They were a family. Happy, without worry, and with a bright future ahead.

However, the point of the book is ‘What if Superman was Batman’. And one constant in the mythology of Batman is the death of the Wayne’s. Leaving the Monarch Theatre, Bruce shouts about how he want’s to be Zorro. “Defender of the weak. Righter of Wrongs”! Martha jokingly mentions that last week he wanted to be John Carter, and before that Sherlock Holmes. As they round the corner, they are confronted by a mugger demanding their money and Martha’s pearls. During the struggle, both Martha and Thomas are shot and die in front of Bruce as he cries on the floor. The mugger turns to Bruce gun pointed, and as Bruce looks up to him, full of rage, Bruce’s powers activate, and he blasts the mugger with his heat vision. The mugger runs in fear, his face burnt and Bruce struggles to control what’s happening to him.

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The mugger is revealed to have been found the next morning, his body burned almost beyond recognition. But is identified as Joe Chill. Because of course. Young Bruce is found by the police, eyes wide, covered in his parent’s blood. After the funeral, Bruce is left in the care of his butler Alfred. Over time he grows and matures, but the guilt and shame still run deep through him, always at the forefront of his mind. At the age of 21, Bruce is bitter to the world, looking through the paper he sees nothing but blood and madness. Nothing but violence and death. As he tosses the paper aside, we see an article informing us that Lex Luther is coming to Gotham City. Because so far there has been far more Batman than Superman in this Superman story, apparently. Bruce unlocks a door to reveal hundreds of newspaper clippings tacked to walls, all relating to acts of senseless murder in his city. As he looks around, he begins to enter a panic attack, thinking about his parents and wanting it all to stop. He runs through the mansion before he realises that people have broken in and holding Alfred hostage. Pointing a gun at Bruce’s face. In a fit of rage, Bruce knocks them all side, even throwing one out the window. As one fires bullets right at him, they simply bounce off. Bruce crushes the gun in the criminal’s hand as his heat vision activates, terrifying the criminal. Alfred watches on, as Bruce breaks down remembering what he did to the man who killed his parents.

In a cave beneath Wayne Manor, Alfred and Bruce look through Thomas Wayne’s journals. As Bruce looks around, testing his super vision, He asks Alfred if he can see his ‘brothers’, referring to the bats in the cave. Testing his flight, Bruce flies among them.

“There’s so much I can do… That I’ve never let myself know I can do.”

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Cut to another location in the city, a man behind a desk telling his men just how disappointed he is in them. Based on his purple and green outfit, brief flashes and pale skin, as well as the maniacal laugh, it’s clear who he is supposed to be. Condiment King. Obviously. He’s chewing them out over their inability to break into a mansion even with the equipment they were given. One of the men starts ranting about how Wayne is crazy, that he put Charly through a window. In retaliation, they are both strangled on the spot, as the figure laughs to himself.

Two months later, the GCPD are after a man on the roof, Mick Johnson. He’s firing at them from up above when a shadowy figure descends upon him. The Batman has arrived! In a flurry of panic, Johnson fires several rounds at Batman only for them to rebound off. In a final moment of panic, Johnson throws a grenade straight at him, only for Batman to catch it and let it explode in his hands. Batman throws Johnson over the edge, letting him fall, before swooping down to grab him and throwing him into the arms of the GCPD.

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The next day, the media is having a field day over the appearance of a cloaked flying figure in the night. Luthor is looking over the paper during a meeting as he is attempting to take over Wayne Enterprises. Just as he’s about to sign the papers, Bruce walks into the meeting telling him that it’s not going to happen. Luthor doesn’t know who he is at first, meaning that Bruce is not very well known publicly, or doesn’t have much involvement with the company. Which leads me to wonder what exactly he has been doing over the years. Bruce puts an end to the deal, saying that he plans to be much more active in the company’s management and dismissing many of the people in the room. As Bruce leaves, it’s clear that Luthor is far from pleased.

Bruce stops off at the Gotham Gazette, the cities local paper and one he now owns, and meets the editor-in-chief Perry White, as well as running into the Gazette’s newest recruit, Lois Lane. Just arrived from the Daily Planet in Metropolis. Around Lois, Bruce becomes a bit a buffoon. Stumbling over his words and knocking into desks. It’s heavily reminiscent of a phrase from Superman: Secret Identity by Kurt Busiek. “If I sound smitten, don’t read too much into it – it’s because I am.”

At this point, it becomes clear that the narrator is Lois. Talking about how she expected Gotham’s famous recluse to be a lot of things, but not a shy, stuttering klutz, referring to him as charming, adorable, and disappointing all at the same time. Walking through the streets, Luthor’s car pulls up along side Lois, offering her a ride home. Lois accepts but Batman is watching from the rooftops. In the car, Lois and Luthor talk about how much things have changed, Luthor alludes to an accident that has changed him as he tries to slip his hand up Lois’s thigh. Lois slaps him across the face and is thrown out of his car. Fifty blocks from her apartment, Lois finds herself on the street with a group of men cat calling to her. They attempt to attack her just as Batman swoops in to save her. After knocking out the guys, he reaches out a hand to Lois asking if he can help. After the events of the night, Lois slaps his hand away and asks him to get away. Batman flies away just as the police arrive to help.

Back at the Gazette, late at night, Lois is typing up an article based on the man who saved her and the state of violence in the city. Bruce finds her there, and Lois instantly questions his appearance. Bruce says that he’s just getting some work done while it’s quiet and asks her what’s wrong. Lois tells him everything about her night, and describes Batman, saying that he has an “utter disregard for human life!” That he could do so much more for the world with those powers. She compares Batman to Bruce, his idealism and dedication, using his wealth to help others. The pair embrace and kiss in the middle of the office. Interestingly, this is a nice little twist on Lois preferring the meta-human to the bumbling co-worker. But even with the change of name and identity, Kal-El and Lois still feel like they are made for one another.

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A few weeks later, a man furiously enters the offices of the Gotham Gazette and demands to see Mr. Wayne. As he crashes his way through, we see his purple and green suit and as he bursts into Bruce’s office, we see that the man is Lex Luther. Removing his hat and prosthetic skin to reveal a bleached white face and thick red lipstick. A jokerised Lex Luthor! Who saw that coming… Bruce jumps up to confront him, only to be blasted back by an umbrellas gun. As Bruce falls out of the window behind him, Joker/Luthor kidnaps Lois and escapes into the night with a small flying machine strapped to his back. As they land on the top of a tall building, complete with devil horned gargoyles. Batman flies in and grabs Joker/Luthor. Flying him high into the sky as narration talks about how Luthor wants to use chaos and violence to take over the city. As Batman announces to Joker/Luthor that he sees him as an “Insufferable Maggot”, that he is going to kill him. Joker/Luthor begins to laugh telling him that he’s just as mad as he is, wouldn’t he agree. As Batman screams “YES!” he throws Luthor to the ground from high above the city, as Lois watches on with the saddest of expressions on her face. Batman looks down at Lois, seeing her face and flies back down and catches Luthor, telling him that he’s going to jail in order to save the city. Batman takes on the hordes of tanks and men working for Joker/Luthor that have been trying to tear apart the city during this whole ordeal. When he’s finished he flies back over to Lois making sure she’s ok.

Lois: “What you did tonight… it was different. Not hate… not vindictiveness… not wasting your gifts on terror and brutality. With your power – There’s so much more you can do. Instead of flexing your muscles… stooping to the level of the very people you’re trying to stop – you can rise above all that. Stand as an example. A symbol of hope.”

Lois reveals that she knows Batman is Bruce Wayne and the pair embrace once again and fly off into the night.

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As the story comes to a close, Lois continues talking about how all of this could have come out so differently. How different the man she loves could have been if he had landed somewhere else. Even making reference to Superman: Red Son as well as the main continuity. As the words play out we see a brighter figure fly over the city of Gotham, and the final page reveals a bright new costume for Bruce, and the new name of SUPERMAN!

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In the end, the story is mainly about nature verses nurture. Not just for Superman but Batman as well. Superman is often called the most human of us all, despite his alien origins. This is largely contributed to his upbringing among salt of the earth people on a farm in Kansas. Batman is often the first to bring it up and often talks about what he would do if he had that kind of power. The book works as a good character study on these ideas. While certainly not the first story to do this for either Batman or Superman (and definitely not the last). Superman: Speeding Bullets is a fine addition to the Elseworld library.

Bendis and Superman [Rant]

Comic Book Resources broke a story earlier that finally announced Brian Michael Bendis’ plans at DC. Having announced his leave from Marvel, in which he worked for 18 years and created characters such as Jessica Jones and Miles Morales. Noted for his work on Ultimate Spider-Man, Avengers, Guardians of the Galaxy, and the countless events he’s initiated and written.


On a personal note, I loved Bendis’ early work, having come out in my childhood and early teens. Particularly the early Ultimate Spider-Man and House of M event. However modern Bendis feels as though he’s lost a fair amount of his spark. Struggling to finish up storylines he starts, forcing Marvel into universe changing events that shake up the characters in OTHER PEOPLES books. Professor Thorgi on YouTube sums up a lot of Bendis’ problems in a handy video.

The idea of Bendis moving to DC, while at one point laughable, seems like a good change of pace for him. A new world to write in, new characters to play with. It was announced a few weeks ago that his first work for DC will be as part of the Action Comics #1000 book. Completely unsurprising as he is a celebrated author and it’s a major milestone. However, the question still remained as to what Bendis would actually be doing for DC. What would be his main book?

Given Bendis’ preference and talents for writing young heroes, one existing book and one possible book seems like the perfect fit for him. Blue Beetle and Shazam! Given that he would also be just getting started in the DC Universe, putting him on a less high-profile book for a little while feel like the right thing to do. However. As CBR broke earlier, Bendis will be starting off on a Superman mini-series (decent idea and rather fitting given the name is Man of Steel, the same name as another former Marvel writter’s series, John Bryne), before taking over both Superman and Action Comics. The main problem here is that Bendis taking over both books is completely unnecessary and could lead to trouble down the line. The very same trouble Marvel have found themselves in in the last few years.

“Following the miniseries, Bendis will write both Superman and Action Comics. The former will relaunch with a new #1, while Action will continue its numbering, with Bendis’ first issue being Action Comics #1001.” [Gerding. 2018]

On the main Superman title, Tomasi and Gleason have been doing an amazing job. Being able to explore the family dynamic, as well as proving multiple times over that they understand the character. In Action Comics, which I can’t overly speak for as I am just about to start reading it, we have Superman veteran Dan Jurgens doing another celebrated run. Both titles have been holding strong with legions of fans. The problem with Bendis taking over both titles is that this gives him tremendous access to characters that could bring about earth shaking cross over events every few months. A problem at Marvel that many argue Bendis started. It feels like this decision from DC is giving Bendis too much power far too quickly.

To add insult to injury, Bendis’ take over Superman will set the book back to #1. Another problem Marvel currently has is a constant string of number 1 issues. DC during the Rebirth initiative proved that they understood this problem and did their best to return a number of their flagship titles to their original numbering. A decision which has lead to the landmark of the #1000 issue of Action Comics.

This decision feels like it’s done out of desperation. One made just to capitalise on a writer who people know, without taking into consideration the writers history. Time will tell, but frankly, my hopes are low.


The Return of Superman’s trunks!

2018 marks two very important milestones for the Man of Steel. The 80th anniversary of the character and the 1,000th issue of Action Comics, the comic he debuted in. None the less Superman fans the world over are excited by these major milestones. These are not just milestones for the character, but for pop culture as a whole.

DC Comics had originally announced that the 1,000th issue would be released in hardcover format and would feature stories from various creators. Including Brian Michael Bendis’ first DC work, and stories from Scott Snyder, Peter Tomasi, Patrick Gleason, Tim Sale, Marv Wolfman, and many more yet to be announced.

Today (January 19th), DC announced another way they will celebrate the landmark issue. The return of Superman’s iconic trunks.


The trunks are not only a staple of superhero iconography but a classic component of Superman’s look. The reason we associate underwear on the outside with superheroes is because of Superman. But going further back, the look comes from circus strongmen who would traditionally wear tight spandex to show off their muscles while performing. The trunks were added out of fear of their spandex ripping in unfortunate places. Superman’s creators Jerry Seigel and Joe Shuster took much of the iconography of circus strongmen in order to emphasis the strength of their creation. The cap and boots added from the world of professional wrestling and to emphasis movement. Particularly the cape.

During the 2011 reboot of DC Comics, known as the ‘New 52’. Many superhero costumes were redesigned, with the most noticeable one being that of Superman’s. Discarding the iconic trunks and giving the entire suit a thin armour appearance that made no real sense for the character. In 2016, DC rebranded themselves with DC Rebirth. Bringing the classic Superman and Lois Lane back into continuity. While his initial introduction back into this new universe did include the classic costume for a glorious half an issue in Superman: Lois and Clark. But Superman still chose to use a trunks-less costume. In Action Comics # 967 Jon, Superman’s young son, asks Superman why he doesn’t wear his old suit. A question echoed by many real-world fans.


Shortly after this exchange in the Superman Reborn storyline, Superman did indeed receive a new costume, though not the return of the trunks. This new suit was still a massive improvement over the New 52 designs. With full red boots, and a redesigned belt incorporating some yellow but it’s still not the classic suit many crave.

The return of the classic look, regardless of how long it will last, is still amazing news to many and a truly wonderful way to celebrate both the 1,000 issue and 80th anniversary.


Superman #39: Goodnight Moon

Superman 039 cov (2018)Despite being one of DCs, and comic books, most powerful heroes. Superman is above all things the best of humanity. Superman #39 showcases this fact beautifully.

While taking on the Demolition Team in Metropolis, Superman finds himself being cheered on by children in the local cancer ward. With the parents and doctor’s permission, Superman with the help of Green Lantern take the children on a day trip to the Justice League Satellite. Made possible by a Green Lantern construct of a rocket ship. Allowing the kids to experience zero-gravity and ‘fly’ along with him. Upon reaching the satellite, the kids are greeted by the looming figures of The Flash, Aquaman, Wonder Woman, Cyborg and Batman. Superman gives each of them a phone and sets up a scavenger hunt for them including finding items such as Superman’s cape, Wonder Woman’s lasso, and the hardest item of all. A picture of Batman smiling. It’s an absolute delight to watch their progress, as well as their progress on the Batman picture. To round off the day, Superman dresses the kids in space suites and allows them to stand on the moon for a while. Knowing many of them don’t have much time left, everyone writes their name on a rock to leave on the Moon’s surface where they will last forever. The issue beautifully ends with the kids and Superman in awe of the Earth from the Moon.

The issue is filled with so many wonderful moments that are a joy to experience. It encapsulates everything Superman should stand for, particularly in darker times. A symbol of hope in a dark world. That absolute power does not have to mean that it’s used for evil and that what makes us human is how we treat others. Superman never gives up on anyone. That as long as there is life in your lungs, no matter how little time you may have left, you deserve to enjoy it. The Justice Leagues action as well in this issue, may show them at their most heroic. Not just patrolling the streets or smiling for the cameras. But acting as heroes and making the kids who look up to them feel hope and joy.

With Superman #39, Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason prove that they understand the character of Superman once again. A must read for all Superman fans and those wanting to know why we love him.


Jorge Jimenez’s original Superboy costume designs

DC Rebirth brought us a brand new Superboy in the form of Clark and Lois’s son, Jonathan Kent. A bright and kind-hearted kid, newly developing his powers and discovering that the father he already looked up to is really Superman. In issue two of Superman, Jon goes along to help his father when he is asked to step up and use his heat vision in action. In the freezing cold arctic weather, he rips open his coat to reveal a two-toned blue shirt with the Superman emblem emblazoned across his chest.

Superman 002 (2016)

Once the action dies down, Superman gets to look at Jon’s shirt. Jon states that he got it from a second-hand store and liked that it had the “S” on it. Comparing it to people wearing Wonder Woman’s and Batman’s logos all the time. That he wanted to feel super, like his dad. Clark’s response is both incredibly poignant, and deeply personal to them both.

“Jon, you’re not like the boy who outgrew this shirt and donated it. I’m afraid someday soon – too soon – you will have to pick it up and embrace the “S” for yourself. it’s not about our powers or strength, or heat vision. It’s about character. It means doing the right thing when no one else will, even when you’re scared…. Even when you think no one is looking.” [Tomasi & Gleason. 2016:09]

Jon’s costume is a wonderful mixture of both the classic Superman and the New 52. The world Jon has lived in already had a Superman that was not his father. The shirt was created to celebrate the darker interpretation, and was donated by someone who outgrew it. Only for it to be picked up and embodied by someone who wants to stand for the same thing as classic Superman. Hope and justice. The two blue tones nicely show this divide between the two, while combining them into one garment. A few issues later, Jon gains a cape and completes his wonderful costume.

On Twitter, Supersons artist Jorge Jimenez released his sketches of the possible costume ideas before the current design.

They scream of the classic, and much missed Superman costume design. Complete with red boots and trunks. The lighter blue is striking, though the high collar is heavily reminiscent of the New 52 armour. But those classic trunks not only harken back to the classic Superman design, but the inspiration behind that. The circus strongmen of the early 1900s.

It’s clear that Jon is perfectly aware of the original costume. In Action Comics #967, Jon pulls up images on his phone asking his father why he never wears either the classic look, or the black suit he wore while in hiding. Clearly enthusiastic about both looks.


While Jon’s current costume fits the character and world perfectly, it’s wonderful to know that in some version of the multiverse. The classic costume lives on through Superboy.

  • Jimenez, Jorge (2018) Do you want to see something curious?? Here my first versions of Superboy’s design. [Twitter] 9th Available from: https://twitter.com/JorgeJimenezArt/status/950760640771182599 [Last Accessed: 09.01.2018]
  • Graydon, D. & Brownie, B. (2016) The Superhero Costume: Identity and Disguise in Fact and Fiction. Bloomsbury Academic: London.
  • Nerdsync (2015) Why Do Superheroes Wear UNDERWEAR on the Outside?!? || Comic Misconceptions || Nerdsync [YouTube] 16th Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOhQlqrp2oM [Last Accessed: 09.01.2018]
  • Tomasi, P. & Gleason, P. (2016) Superman #2. DC Comics: Burbank.

Deluxe hard covers, The price of books, and Independent stores

Over the past two weeks it’s safe to say I have heavily added to my comic shelves. Specifically in the Deluxe hardback department. When it comes to DC and Marvel, though honestly more DC, there are some titles I end up buying multiple times over. For example, take my beloved Superman series. I buy the single issues which I then lend out to a friend. I bought the first two trade paper backs covering the first 13 issues, and the Rebirth one shot. And after that I really wanted the deluxe volume. So, if I was to add everything up at full price that would be $2.99 x 13, which is $38.87 (granted, over a long period of time). I’m doing this in dollar’s despite being English because of the listed prices on the actual item and I’ll do a conversion at the end. Just getting that info out of the way now. The two trade paper backs are $16.99 each. So, $33.98. and the deluxe volume is $34.99. In total that’s $107.84 for the same content 3 times over. And I know someone will say I made a mistake there because it should be $2.99 times 14 with the Rebirth one shot, but I never bought that one so discounted it here. Converting Dollars to Sterling that means I should have payed a total of £79.52. What I actually spent was £81.53 because issues cost an average of £2.50 depending on which store I visit, the trades cost £14.99 in normal book stores like Waterstones (which is not the best option for buying comics, supporting smaller stores has major benefits for both you and the owners) and I got the deluxe volume from Amazon for £19.05.

Yeah, if you can’t tell I’ve been seriously rethinking how I buy comics. Particularly from DC. None of this is a slight towards DC’s pricing I think it’s very reasonable. It’s more talking about the quality of their product to the point that I own the same content 3 times! To be honest its not the only DC content I own 3 times, and I tend to justify it by the fact that they are in different formats. The fact that I have 3 versions of both Kingdom Come and Superman Secret Identity doesn’t bother me. For the record that’s trade paperback, Deluxe edition, and French hardcover.

I love DCs current Superman title so I don’t mind owning it three times. What I do mind is realising how much it all cost me and how that money could have been used to check out other titles and support them. The problem I see is that the idea of spending £2.50 every other week seems fairly reasonable, until you consider the long-term price. But in the past I’ve actively avoided buying what I considered to be over-priced deluxe editions because I can’t afford it. Here in England, the recommended retail price for DC’s current line of deluxe rebirth books is £30 (though when you convert Dollars to Sterling, it should be only around £25.80, but I’ll give them the £4.20 for import charge). Buying these from regular books stores, like Waterstones or WHSmith, that is exactly what you would pay. Amazon lists them between £15 (The Flash) and £30 (Action Comics) with the majority around £20. A recent trip to Limited Edition in Stevenage (a rather charming and friendly comic store in the cities centre) netted me that £30 Action Comics Deluxe for only £20. A damn good deal in my books.

Over the winter break, I took advantage of a little extra money and caved in to my desire to own some of these beautiful deluxe editions. Happily picking up the Rebirth deluxe books for Superman, Action Comics, Batman, Detective Comics, Wonder Woman, and The Flash. As well as the recent deluxe release of Shazam: The New Beginning and a paperback copy of New Frontier. That trip to Limited Edition also got me the first ultimate collection for Image’s Invincible series by Robert Kirkman for £10. Something I am heavily looking forward to trying as Kirkman’s more famous series, The Walking Dead, has never managed to peak my interest. Either in comics or the television series.

Even discounting the fact that most of these books were brought with gift cards, the experience has forced me to evaluate my approach to buying comics and spend money more wisely. However, when taking this all into account I’m forced to think about the actual companies that produce the books I read. As I said earlier the money spend on multiple versions of the same thing could have been used to support other series. For DC’s more popular series, like Batman and Superman, this is less of a problem. They are flag ship titles that are guaranteed to continue publication and get deluxe volumes. However, especially at Marvel and smaller publishers. Good titles get cancelled frequently due to a lack of support. For example, I thoroughly enjoyed the Silk series from Marvel written by Robbie Thompson. Despite being a good series, the book was cancelled a year ago due to a lack of people buying the single issues. Ending on issue 19 of the second run. Granted, Marvel has become infamous for cancelling books early. YouTuber Professor Thorgi mentions how Chip Zdarsky’s Star Lord series was cancelled at only 6 issues in his video What’s Causing Marvel’s Low Sales – HINT: It’s Not Diversity – ediTHORGIals. Leading many readers to believe it was meant to be a miniseries (typically around 4 to 6 issues long), before it was confirmed that the book was cancelled due to low sales. He goes into plenty of detail in his video discussing the facts that the character is popular, the writer is well known and liked, but the book still sold poorly due to a mixture of Marvel’s pricing, constant relaunches, poor marketing and the amount of books Marvel release week to week. This is worse for independent publishers as they have no guarantee for collective trades even if their work sells relatively well.

With these recent purchases, I can say that the deluxe rebirth books DC have released are completely worth the money and the time to wait for them. Collecting at least the first 13 issues, 15 in the case of Batman. They look wonderful on the shelf with clean white spines, and bright defined covers using art from one of the single issues included inside. The paper stock is clear and of high quality with a sown binding to allow the pages to flex easily and creates less gutter space cut off when reading. The crowning beauty of these books is the added detail under the dust jacket. Gorgeous two-page spreads printed directly onto the books cover in place of the standard black. For bigger titles from DC it’s more than worth waiting it out and picking these up instead of the standard trade paperbacks.

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